Guest Contributors

Have Connected Devices Become a Cybersecurity Nightmare?

This blog was updated on May 22,2017, with the latest information about the Device Enrollment Program from Apple. Join the conversation on Twitter using #iOSinBusiness.

What is the Device Enrollment Program from Apple?

The Device Enrollment Program provides a fast, streamlined way to deploy your corporate-owned Mac, iOS or tvOS devices. With a mobile device management (MDM) and unified endpoint management solution like VMware AirWatch, IT can:

  • Customize device settings;
  • Activate and supervise devices over the air; and
  • Enable users to setup their own devices out of the box.

[Related: 27 Questions Answered about AirWatch & the Device Enrollment Program from Apple]

What IT challenges does the Device Enrollment Program help address?

The Device Enrollment Program solves several critical requirements for corporate-owned devices. First, organizations save time and money by eliminating high-touch processes for IT. DEP takes configuration time to zero. Deployment of corporate-owned devices with DEP means zero-touch configuration for IT, eliminates staging and automates device configuration.

Second, onboarding iOS or macOS devices is streamlined for users. Based on the settings IT configured, users are prompted through Setup Assistant (skipping through any unnecessary screens). Users only need to authenticate and don&#rsquo;t need to be tech savvy to get the content, apps and email they need on their smartphones.

Finally, supervising iOS devices over the air is possible with the DEP. With supervision, administrators have more control over the device and can disable features like AirDrop, the App Store and account modification. They can also enable features like password protection. Also, the MDM profile cannot be removed, which eliminates the possibility of un-enrollment to protect data and investments in devices and provides the best user experience possible.

What role does AirWatch play in Apple&#rsquo;s Device Enrollment Program?

To utilize the Device Enrollment Program, MDM capabilities like those part of VMware AirWatch are required. AirWatch integrates with the Device Enrollment Program, enabling organizations to automatically import devices in the console based on order history. Then, administrators can easily configure settings, apply profiles, assign applications and set restrictions that will apply automatically when users unbox devices.

[Related: iOS 10.3, tvOS 10.2 & macOS 10.12.4 Are Live! VMware AirWatch Has Your Mobile Business Covered]

How can I join the Device Enrollment Program from Apple?

First, enroll with Apple and register your organization&#rsquo;s information to create an account and designate your administrators. Next, configure your device settings and Setup Assistant steps in the AirWatch console. You then can ship devices directly to your users.

For more information, check out Apple&#rsquo;s Device Enrollment Program Guide.

What are the device requirements for the Apple Device Enrollment Program?

The devices must be corporate-owned and purchased directly from Apple or through participating Apple Authorized Resellers.*

*The Device Enrollment Program may not be supported by all Apple Authorized Resellers and carriers.

Where is the Device Enrollment Program available?

The Device Enrollment Program is available in 34 countries: Australia,Austria,Belgium,Brazil,Canada,Czech Republic,Denmark,Finland,France,Germany, Greece,Hong Kong,Hungary,India,Ireland,Italy,Japan,Luxembourg,Mexico,Netherlands, NewZealand,Norway,Poland,Portugal,Singapore,South Africa,Spain,Sweden,Switzerland, Taiwan,Turkey,United Arab Emirates,United Kingdom andUnitedStates.

What’s available for education with the Device Enrollment Program from Apple?

Both Apple and AirWatch give special consideration to unique education use cases. With Apple School Manager (ASM), Apple has delivered a central place for account creation, role definitions and content purchases. To support ASM, AirWatch designed a console section for education to setup mobile deployments and streamline management of teachers, students, classes, apps and more—whether you have a 1:1 or shared device deployment. After importing data from Apple School Manager, use AirWatch to:

  • Match devices with students or classes;
  • Assign applications (to users or devices); and
  • Configure the new Classroom application, allowing teachers to guide learning on iPads.

Students quickly choose the device with their photo displayed once their teacher has started the class.

Visit apple.com/business/dep/ and apple.com/education/it/ to learn more about the Device Enrollment Program.

 

Read more..

Securing Enterprise Mobility after Shadow IT Strikes

By Brian Duckering, Marketing and Strategy Executive, Skycure For years now, your IT and security admins debated proper methods, tools and policies to mobilize your enterprise. While these official discussions dragged on, your users unofficially started using their mobile devices (#ShadowIT) for everything from email to managing and editing highly confidential documents and communications. They&#rsquo;re […]]> By Brian Duckering, Marketing and Strategy Executive, Skycure

For years now, your IT and security admins debated proper methods, tools and policies to mobilize your enterprise. While these official discussions dragged on, your users unofficially started using their mobile devices (#ShadowIT) for everything from email to managing and editing highly confidential documents and communications.

They&#rsquo;re not doing this to spite you or your company. They&#rsquo;re doing it because it fuels their productivity. Believe it or not, users break the rules to be more productive!

Though users&#rsquo; motivations are in the right place, it still puts IT in a precarious situation. Your enterprise has already mobilized itself. So how do you make sure that all of those devices are properly managed and secured (to protect both your end users and, perhaps more importantly, all the sensitive systems and data they access)?

And, let&#rsquo;s be honest, the clock is ticking. You need an effective mobile strategy to prevent a mobile breach that could cost your company a lot of money (and bad press).

Different Problem, Different Solution

One big challenge, though, is that mobile security requires a different solution than desktop or network security. Traditional systems that handle patch and identity management, anti-virus, firewalls, encryption, etc., simply don&#rsquo;t translate into an effective mobile security strategy.

Traditional anti-virus solutions, for example, won&#rsquo;t do anything to stop (let alone mitigate) ransomware that&#rsquo;s infected a user&#rsquo;s mobile device. Traditional firewalls won&#rsquo;t do anything to stop users from connecting to insecure or malicious Wi-Fi networks. And traditional encryption won&#rsquo;t keep users&#rsquo; documents safe if they lose their mobile device and haven&#rsquo;t set up a passcode.

The bad news is you can&#rsquo;t solve these mobile security challenges with traditional systems. The good news is you can solve them by integrating enterprise mobile management (EMM) and mobile threat defense (MTD).

[Read more: New Whitepaper! How to Select, Implement & Succeed with Mobile Threat Defense]

MTD + EMM

EMM solutions, like VMware AirWatch, handle onboarding, reporting and policy management (and enforcement). MTD solutions, like Skycure, handle the real-time, proactive prevention and mitigation of security threats (and report them back to the EMM solution, too). Skycure further simplifies the management and maintenance of the solution by relying on a public app that adheres to all of Apple&#rsquo;s and Google&#rsquo;s best practices and updates automatically, with no extra steps required by IT.

The integration of these two solutions is critical because it provides the 360 degrees of protection that end users (and your company) need. Recall why users started self-mobilizing in the first place: Productivity. What is the enemy of productivity? Interruption.

Thankfully, properly integrating EMM and MTD solutions means users can be productive with their mobile devices without the interruption of malware, malicious networks or device vulnerabilities. It also means IT can be productive without the interruptions of compromised mobile devices.

With an integrated EMM and MTD solution in place, you can automatically prevent ransomware installations, block connections to malicious networks and remotely wipe mobile devices if they are lost or stolen. These are just a few examples of the automated mitigation that a strong, seamless mobile security deployment provides.

[Watch: Republic National Distributing Company (RNDC) Secures Mobile Devices with VMware AirWatch & Skycure]

Learn More

In today&#rsquo;s mobile age, it is no question that end users work on their mobile devices with or without the official support of IT. IT&#rsquo;s job now is to deploy a mobile security strategy that empowers them to perform seamless onboarding, policy enforcement and management, real-time threat prevention and mitigation and reporting. Thankfully for IT, the tools for a successful mobile security strategy are already available via EMM and MTD.

You can find more information on EMM from AirWatch and more information on MTD at the Skycure website.

Read more..

Guest Blog: Our Top 4 Mobile Security Lessons from 2016

As businesses slow down over the festive break, it&#rsquo;s a good time to look back over some of the mobile threats that emerged in the past year to better prepare for what&#rsquo;s ahead. Upon reflection, mobile security is clearly more important than ever. Today&#rsquo;s mobile devices are living in a hostile environment, where well-crafted and […]]>

by David Renwick, Wandera Director Product Advocacy

As businesses slow down over the festive break, it&#rsquo;s a good time to look back over some of the mobile threats that emerged in the past year to better prepare for what&#rsquo;s ahead. Upon reflection, mobile security is clearly more important than ever. Today&#rsquo;s mobile devices are living in a hostile environment, where well-crafted and sophisticated attacks are on the rise. Here are four of the top mobile security lessons we&#rsquo;ve learned from 2016.

1. Hummingbad/Hummer: Malware Is Big Business

If the motivation behind why people create malware escapes you, look no further than Hummingbad. Simply put: malware is big business. With this attack, the device actively generates fraudulent ad-clicks and downloads, which in turn generate micro-payments for someone, somewhere.Scale that activity across millions of devices, and soon enough, a lucrative business takes shape. Perhaps we brought this one on ourselves by building the pay-per-click, freeware, ad-driven economy for all those &#rsquo;free&#rdquo; apps and games, instead of putting our hands in our pockets and actually purchasing the apps we really want and need. Nevertheless, Hummingbad and its variants did an effective job of draining our device batteries and data plans, hampering our productivity and compromising our privacy and security.

[Related: What You Need to Know about Hummingbad]

2. SMS Attacks

We continue to see malicious apps requesting access to SMS capabilities on Android devices. And many users simply grant access without understanding the risk. 2016 saw a very targeted version of this attack in Australia. An app specifically looked out for an SMS from a known bank with an activation code and then harvested the information.And then, just a few weeks, I opened up my News app and saw this headline: 700 million Android handsets may be secretly sending users’ texts to China every 72 hours. SMS harvesting is just as easy and popular than it ever was, folks.

3. Pegasus

Back in September, there was a mini watershed moment when the Pegasus news broke. It demonstrated the precision in which hackers work to execute targeted, sophisticated and weaponized mobile cyber attacks and bared some uncomfortable truths. In itself, this attack is very rare. The average user is unlikely to be subjected to it directly. Plus, by the time it hit the headlines, the vulnerability was patched.

What was so special? Pegasus was a weaponized toolkit that made use of three rare iOS vulnerabilities. One vulnerability of significance is rare, so having three in play at once is an unusual case. What could Pegasus do? If you&#rsquo;ve heard all those stories about smartphones listening into your calls or reading your messages and passwords, that&#rsquo;s what it could do.

Pegasus was by all accounts very sophisticated. It was built for surveillance, and the first rule of surveillance is to remain undetected for as long as possible. Cover your tracks and leave with no (or very little) trace when you are done, so your target remains oblivious. The designers of Pegasus kept this in mind when thinking about the more obvious or clumsy run-of-the-mill jailbreak techniques we&#rsquo;ve seen in the past. Still, with all its targeted sophistication and rare attributes, Pegasus made us think about what is possible. I can&#rsquo;t help feeling that a genie escaped from a bottle this year.

[Related: What You Need to Know about Trident & Pegusus]

4. TAPS: The OMG Moment of Conflicting Human Ingenuity

Most people know security best practices, but don&#rsquo;t take the simple things seriously, such as passwords, security codes, tokens and all the things designed to bolster convenience and security. I couldn&#rsquo;t help being amazed at human ingenuity and simultaneously disheartened by TAPS: Touchscreen Sticker with Touch ID. It&#rsquo;s a sticker. You attach it to a glove, and it simulates a fingerprint so that you don&#rsquo;t have to take your glove off to unlock your most valuable, personal and precious device.

The technology behind Touch ID is incredible. It recognizes your fingerprint in a tenth of a second and makes purchasing an app quick but still secure. But in one fell swoop, TAPS undermines one of the most unique, personal and attached authentication mechanisms and throws it out of the window. Multiple factor authentication is extremely important. Always ensure there is more than one request for access to your device in case one is compromised. Even though Touch ID is available on most smartphones, biometrics are still a long way from becoming the primary way into our devices and for good reason.

What Can We Expect in 2017?

After another year or mobile threat evolution, there&#rsquo;s no sign of these threats stopping in 2017. It&#rsquo;s easy to see why malicious actors target mobile devices. Users store more information and access more services on smartphones and tablets than ever before. All that personal data is attractive to hackers and thieves. At the same time, device usage is increasing, and the amount of data is growing, too. Faster and more efficient cellular data access means we enjoying a revolutionary mobile experience that&#rsquo;s better than the last. Unfortunately, there are people who will exploit the technology.

Despite the prevalence of threats, we should still be excited for 2017 and the innovations that will hit the market to further this revolution. Security experts continue to develop and apply sophisticated technologies, such as machine learning, for mobile security to ensure businesses and end users can feel safe in today&#rsquo;s mobile world.

David leads Wandera’s product advocacy group, working with the company’s largest customers to develop and implement leading-edge solutions. A specialist in enterprise mobility, EMM, MDM, BYOD enablement and technology innovation, David started his career in technology over 25 years ago at the outset of the PC revolution. David has worked at some of the world’s most reputable technology companies, including Apple and VMware AirWatch, where he held various positions across multiple continents, including iOS Technical Specialist for EMEA and Innovation Director.

Because you liked this blog:

  • Gooligan Malware: What You Need to Know
  • VMware AirWatch Security: Year In Review
  • Derived Credentials: What You Need to Know

Read more..

Guest Blog: Our Top 4 Mobile Security Lessons from 2016

As businesses slow down over the festive break, it&#rsquo;s a good time to look back over some of the mobile threats that emerged in the past year to better prepare for what&#rsquo;s ahead. Upon reflection, mobile security is clearly more important than ever. Today&#rsquo;s mobile devices are living in a hostile environment, where well-crafted and […]]>

by David Renwick, Wandera Director Product Advocacy

As businesses slow down over the festive break, it&#rsquo;s a good time to look back over some of the mobile threats that emerged in the past year to better prepare for what&#rsquo;s ahead. Upon reflection, mobile security is clearly more important than ever. Today&#rsquo;s mobile devices are living in a hostile environment, where well-crafted and sophisticated attacks are on the rise. Here are four of the top mobile security lessons we&#rsquo;ve learned from 2016.

1. Hummingbad/Hummer: Malware Is Big Business

If the motivation behind why people create malware escapes you, look no further than Hummingbad. Simply put: malware is big business. With this attack, the device actively generates fraudulent ad-clicks and downloads, which in turn generate micro-payments for someone, somewhere.Scale that activity across millions of devices, and soon enough, a lucrative business takes shape. Perhaps we brought this one on ourselves by building the pay-per-click, freeware, ad-driven economy for all those &#rsquo;free&#rdquo; apps and games, instead of putting our hands in our pockets and actually purchasing the apps we really want and need. Nevertheless, Hummingbad and its variants did an effective job of draining our device batteries and data plans, hampering our productivity and compromising our privacy and security.

[Related: What You Need to Know about Hummingbad]

2. SMS Attacks

We continue to see malicious apps requesting access to SMS capabilities on Android devices. And many users simply grant access without understanding the risk. 2016 saw a very targeted version of this attack in Australia. An app specifically looked out for an SMS from a known bank with an activation code and then harvested the information.And then, just a few weeks, I opened up my News app and saw this headline: 700 million Android handsets may be secretly sending users’ texts to China every 72 hours. SMS harvesting is just as easy and popular than it ever was, folks.

3. Pegasus

Back in September, there was a mini watershed moment when the Pegasus news broke. It demonstrated the precision in which hackers work to execute targeted, sophisticated and weaponized mobile cyber attacks and bared some uncomfortable truths. In itself, this attack is very rare. The average user is unlikely to be subjected to it directly. Plus, by the time it hit the headlines, the vulnerability was patched.

What was so special? Pegasus was a weaponized toolkit that made use of three rare iOS vulnerabilities. One vulnerability of significance is rare, so having three in play at once is an unusual case. What could Pegasus do? If you&#rsquo;ve heard all those stories about smartphones listening into your calls or reading your messages and passwords, that&#rsquo;s what it could do.

Pegasus was by all accounts very sophisticated. It was built for surveillance, and the first rule of surveillance is to remain undetected for as long as possible. Cover your tracks and leave with no (or very little) trace when you are done, so your target remains oblivious. The designers of Pegasus kept this in mind when thinking about the more obvious or clumsy run-of-the-mill jailbreak techniques we&#rsquo;ve seen in the past. Still, with all its targeted sophistication and rare attributes, Pegasus made us think about what is possible. I can&#rsquo;t help feeling that a genie escaped from a bottle this year.

[Related: What You Need to Know about Trident & Pegusus]

4. TAPS: The OMG Moment of Conflicting Human Ingenuity

Most people know security best practices, but don&#rsquo;t take the simple things seriously, such as passwords, security codes, tokens and all the things designed to bolster convenience and security. I couldn&#rsquo;t help being amazed at human ingenuity and simultaneously disheartened by TAPS: Touchscreen Sticker with Touch ID. It&#rsquo;s a sticker. You attach it to a glove, and it simulates a fingerprint so that you don&#rsquo;t have to take your glove off to unlock your most valuable, personal and precious device.

The technology behind Touch ID is incredible. It recognizes your fingerprint in a tenth of a second and makes purchasing an app quick but still secure. But in one fell swoop, TAPS undermines one of the most unique, personal and attached authentication mechanisms and throws it out of the window. Multiple factor authentication is extremely important. Always ensure there is more than one request for access to your device in case one is compromised. Even though Touch ID is available on most smartphones, biometrics are still a long way from becoming the primary way into our devices and for good reason.

What Can We Expect in 2017?

After another year or mobile threat evolution, there&#rsquo;s no sign of these threats stopping in 2017. It&#rsquo;s easy to see why malicious actors target mobile devices. Users store more information and access more services on smartphones and tablets than ever before. All that personal data is attractive to hackers and thieves. At the same time, device usage is increasing, and the amount of data is growing, too. Faster and more efficient cellular data access means we enjoying a revolutionary mobile experience that&#rsquo;s better than the last. Unfortunately, there are people who will exploit the technology.

Despite the prevalence of threats, we should still be excited for 2017 and the innovations that will hit the market to further this revolution. Security experts continue to develop and apply sophisticated technologies, such as machine learning, for mobile security to ensure businesses and end users can feel safe in today&#rsquo;s mobile world.

David leads Wandera’s product advocacy group, working with the company’s largest customers to develop and implement leading-edge solutions. A specialist in enterprise mobility, EMM, MDM, BYOD enablement and technology innovation, David started his career in technology over 25 years ago at the outset of the PC revolution. David has worked at some of the world’s most reputable technology companies, including Apple and VMware AirWatch, where he held various positions across multiple continents, including iOS Technical Specialist for EMEA and Innovation Director.

Because you liked this blog:

  • Gooligan Malware: What You Need to Know
  • VMware AirWatch Security: Year In Review
  • Derived Credentials: What You Need to Know

Read more..

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